Lancôme

Suzana Rose

Lancôme is NOT cruelty-free.

This means that this brand either tests on animals, pays for animal testing, or sells in mainland China. Some brands that fall under this category test on animals where required by law, which means they're not cruelty-free.

Lancôme is owned by L'Oréal, a company that is not cruelty-free.

Lancôme

At a Glance

Finished products tested on animals Yes, where required by law
Ingredients tested on animals No, with possible exceptions
Suppliers test on animals No, with possible exceptions
Third party animal testing Yes, where required by law
Sold in mainland China Yes

Lancôme's Official Animal Testing Policy

“Lancôme is committed to upholding the highest standards of safety for all the products it makes and sells. We adhere to the most rigorous standards for product safety so that our customers can purchase and use our products with complete confidence.

We want you to know that:

Lancôme is in full compliance with FDA regulations as well as the European Union 7th Amendment Cosmetic Directive and the requirements for safety in all of the countries in which our products are sold.

Each and every ingredient used in our products has been thoroughly reviewed and tested by our internal safety team made up of toxicologists, clinicians, pharmacists and physicians.

Every product formulation that Lancôme manufactures is screened and tested for safety before it is marketed to consumers.

We at Lancôme do not conduct animal testing on our products or ingredients, nor ask others to test on our behalf, except when required by law. As we continue to expand globally and reach our customers around the world, it is our practice to do our part towards advancing the science of safety and validated alternative methods that eliminate the need or requirement for any animal testing globally.

In 1989, our parent company, L’Oreal voluntarily stopped using animal testing for the evaluation of its entire range of finished products. The company has invested more than $1 billion over the last 25 years to develop innovative, alternative methods to animal testing, particularly in the area of reconstructed tissue development. L’Oreal and Lancôme are totally committed to a future without tests on animals.”

What This Means

Simply put, Lancôme tests on animals where required by law. They also sell cosmetics in stores in mainland China, which means that they products were likely tested on animals in the country.

Any brand that tests on animals where required by law cannot be considered cruelty-free, since they willingly agree to pay for animal tests to be performed on their products.

From Their Website

Lancôme’s animal testing policy is displayed on their website, although you do have to dig for it in the FAQ. Typically companies clearly answer the question “are your products tested on animals?” In this case, their animal testing policy is “hidden” under the question “What is Lancôme’s commitment to product safety?”

Here’s a screenshot of the section, with their animal testing policy:

Details

Lancôme is a French luxury brand that mainly offers skincare, makeup, and fragrance. They were acquired by L’Oreal in 1964 and have been a subsidiary of the brand ever since.

Why We Classify Brands Like Lancôme As “Not Cruelty-Free”

The term “cruelty-free” is unregulated. This means any brand can claim to be cruelty-free without breaking the law, even if they test on animals.

Because of this, we communicate with brands directly to gather information about their full animal testing policy.

Brands who are classified as “not cruelty-free” break one or more of the Cruelty-Free 5:

  • Their company engages in animal testing
  • Their suppliers engage in animal testing
  • They allow third-parties to test on animals on their behalf
  • They test on animals where required by law
  • They knowingly sell cosmetics in stores in mainland China, where animal testing could be performed

A supplier is any company that sells the brand raw materials, ingredients, or finished products. A third-party is an outside company or entity, whether or not it’s hired by the brand.

What’s The Deal With China?

Many beauty brands choose to sell their products in China. It’s important to note that these companies can not be considered cruelty-free.

As of 2020, China still requires most cosmetics to be tested on animals in order to be sold in the country.

As for products which can bypass these mandatory tests, the Chinese authorities may still pull these products from the shelves and have them tested on animals. Although the chance is small, we believe that companies can not be considered “cruelty-free” while taking this risk.

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